News

News

Superfast method for ceramic manufacturing could open door to AI-driven material discovery

Date: 2020-05-07
Views: 231

Scientists in the University of Maryland (UMD)'s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3D printing technologies, and beyond.


Ceramics are widely used in batteries, electronics, and extreme environments -- but conventional ceramic sintering (part of the firing process used in the manufacture of ceramic objects) often requires hours of processing time. To overcome this challenge, a Maryland research team has invented an ultrafast high-temperature sintering method that both meets the needs of modern ceramics and fosters the discovery of new material innovations.


The study is led by Liangbing Hu, Herbert Rabin Distinguished Professor of the A. James Clark School of Engineering and director of the Center for Materials Innovation at UMD.


Conventional sintering techniques require a long processing time -- it takes hours for a furnace to heat up, then several hours more to 'bake' the ceramic material -- which is particularly problematic in the development of electrolytes for solid-state batteries. Alternative sintering technologies (such as microwave-assisted sintering, spark plasma sintering, and flash sintering) are limited for a variety of reasons, often because they are material-specific and/or expensive.


The Maryland team's new method of ultrafast high-temperature sintering offers high heating and high cooling rates, an even temperature distribution, and sintering temperatures of up to 3,000 degrees Celsius. Combined, these processes require less than 10 seconds of total processing time -- more than 1,000 times faster than the traditional furnace approach of sintering.


'With this invention, we 'sandwiched' a pressed green pellet of ceramic precursor powders between two strips of carbon that quickly heated the pellet through radiation and conduction, creating a consistent high-temperature environment that forced the ceramic powder to solidify quickly,' Hu said. 'The temperature is high enough to sinter basically any ceramic material. This patented process can be extended to other membranes beyond ceramics.'


The study was conducted through close collaboration with Yifei Mo (associate professor, UMD), J.C Zhao (professor and department chair, UMD), Howard Wang (visiting research professor, UMD), Jian Luo (professor, UC San Diego), Xiaoyu Zheng (assistant professor, UCLA), and Bruce Dunn (professor and department chair, UCLA).


'Ultrafast high-temperature sintering represents a breakthrough in ultrafast sintering technologies, not only because of its general applicability to a broad range of functional materials, but also due to a great potential of creating non-equilibrium bulk materials via retaining or generating extra defects,' said Luo.


The rapid sintering technology is being commercialized through HighT-Tech LLC, a UMD spinoff company with a focus on a range of high temperature technologies.


'This new method solves the key bottleneck problem in computation and AI-guided materials discovery,' said Mo. 'We've enabled a new paradigm for materials discovery with an unprecedented accelerated pace.'


'We are delighted to see the pyrolysis time reduced from tens of hours to a few seconds, preserving the fine 3D-printed structures after fast sintering,' Zheng said.


Via: https://www.sciencedaily.com

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


News / Recommended news More
2020 - 05 - 14
MIM is currently the most scientific near net shape forming technology for metal parts formation. It can flexibly adjust to various performance indexes and has been successfully applied to popular areas such as auto parts, 3C digital, medical equipment and tool locks. Hence, traditional molding technologies such as CNC fine processing, to some extent, are being replaced. Although the future of MIM...
2020 - 05 - 14
The East China Powder Metallurgy Technology Exchange Meeting, rotationally presented by the powder metallurgy societies in East China, has been successfully held for 17 years since 1982. It’s considered as one of the important platforms for China's powder metallurgy industry exchanges, and has actively promoted the flourishing development of the industry and related industries in East China and ev...
2020 - 05 - 14
Ceramic 3D printing can be used in preparation of multifunctional ceramics with complex structure and high precision, and will be widely used in architecture, engineering, medicine, aerospace and more. In recent years, metal and plastic 3D printing companies is shifting to the ceramic materials field that has increasing demand for strong, tough and high temperature resistant parts, which promotes ...
2020 - 05 - 07
Scientists in the University of Maryland (UMD)'s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3D printing technologies, and beyond.Ceramics are widely used in batteries, electronics, and extreme environm...
Share:
Uniris Exhibition Shanghai Co., Ltd.
Shanghai Branch
Tel: 4000 778 909 
E-mail:irisexpo@163.com

Guangzhou Branch
Tel: 020-8327 6389
E-mail:iacechina@unifair.com

IACE CHINA Official Website
犀牛云提供企业云服务
犀牛云提供云计算服务
Scan