News

News

Laser Welding Ceramics Technique Promises Stronger Electronics

Date: 2019-09-11
Views: 260

Laser Welding Ceramics Technique Promises Stronger Electronics


Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a process for welding ceramics that could have wide-ranging implications for the hardiness and construction of electronics.

According to a paper published in Science on August 23rd,, UC-San Diego researchers have used a sub-50-watt, rapidly-pulsing laser to melt and fuse ceramics, upending traditional ceramics welding methods by dramatically lowering the temperature at which the material binds.

Traditionally, ceramics have been difficult to weld because they require immense amounts of heat to make them malleable enough to fuse. While heating ceramics to these temperatures isn’t difficult, cooling them uniformly has been challenging—if a ceramic material cools in uneven conditions, it’s susceptible to cracking, splitting and other types of catastrophic states of being.

To make their new systems for ceramic welding work, engineers optimized two aspects of the laser welding process: the laser parameters (a.k.a. the laser exposure time, the number of laser pulses, and the duration of each laser pulse) and the transparency of the target ceramic material.

“The sweet spot of ultrafast pulses was two picoseconds at the high repetition rate of one megahertz, along with a moderate total number of pulses. This maximized the melt diameter, minimized material ablation, and timed cooling just right for the best weld possible,” said Guillermo Aguilar, chair of mechanical engineering at UC Riverside.

Javier E. Garay, a professor of mechanical engineering at UC San Diego, added, “By focusing the energy right where we want it, we avoid setting up temperature gradients throughout the ceramic, so we can encase temperature-sensitive materials without damaging them.”

Given the fact that there are new ceramic materials that are both very hard and shatter-resistant, a new welding technology that can guarantee the material consistency of ceramics post-manufacture could lead to breakthrough medical devices as well as consumer electronics.

Although the ceramic laser welding process has only been tested on small samples within a lab setting, researchers are optimistic that they will be able to scale their process with relative ease. If that prediction does become reality, then many of the fragile consumer electronics that we gingerly tote about day by day could be in for a much more rough-and-tumble existence in the near future.


Via: https://www.engineering.com

News / Recommended news More
2020 - 05 - 14
MIM is currently the most scientific near net shape forming technology for metal parts formation. It can flexibly adjust to various performance indexes and has been successfully applied to popular areas such as auto parts, 3C digital, medical equipment and tool locks. Hence, traditional molding technologies such as CNC fine processing, to some extent, are being replaced. Although the future of MIM...
2020 - 05 - 14
The East China Powder Metallurgy Technology Exchange Meeting, rotationally presented by the powder metallurgy societies in East China, has been successfully held for 17 years since 1982. It’s considered as one of the important platforms for China's powder metallurgy industry exchanges, and has actively promoted the flourishing development of the industry and related industries in East China and ev...
2020 - 05 - 14
Ceramic 3D printing can be used in preparation of multifunctional ceramics with complex structure and high precision, and will be widely used in architecture, engineering, medicine, aerospace and more. In recent years, metal and plastic 3D printing companies is shifting to the ceramic materials field that has increasing demand for strong, tough and high temperature resistant parts, which promotes ...
2020 - 05 - 07
Scientists in the University of Maryland (UMD)'s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3D printing technologies, and beyond.Ceramics are widely used in batteries, electronics, and extreme environm...
Share:
Uniris Exhibition Shanghai Co., Ltd.
Shanghai Branch
Tel: 4000 778 909 
E-mail:irisexpo@163.com

Guangzhou Branch
Tel: 020-8327 6389
E-mail:iacechina@unifair.com

IACE CHINA Official Website
犀牛云提供企业云服务
犀牛云提供云计算服务
Scan