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Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a process for welding ceramics that could have wide-ranging implications for the hardiness and construction of electronics.According to a paper published in Science on August 23rd,, UC-San Diego researchers have used a sub-50-watt, rapidly-pulsing laser to melt and fuse ceramics, upending traditional ceramics welding methods by dramatically lowering the temperature at which the material binds.Traditionally, ceramics have been difficult to weld because they require immense amounts of heat to make them malleable enough to fuse. While heating ceramics to these temperatures isn’t difficult, cooling them uniformly has been challenging—if a ceramic material cools in uneven conditions, it’s susceptible to cracking, spli...
发布时间: 2019 - 09 - 11
浏览次数:245
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a process for welding ceramics that could have wide-ranging implications for the hardiness and construction of electronics.
发布时间: 2019 - 09 - 11
浏览次数:245
Researchers have found a way to use 3D printing to stretch and flatten twisted polymers so that they conduct electricity better.
发布时间: 2019 - 09 - 06
浏览次数:217
We live in a ceramic world. Ceramics are everywhere even in the world of engineering. The most important and general property of ceramics is that they are refractory. What does this mean? They are “rough-and-tumble” materials that will take large amounts of abuse in a wide range of situations. Don’t believe us?
发布时间: 2019 - 08 - 28
浏览次数:128
Ceramic aerogels have been protecting industrial equipment and space-bound scientific instruments for decades, thanks to their incredible lightness and ability to withstand intense heat. The problem is they can be pretty brittle. Now, a team led by researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) has developed a new ceramic aerogel that's far hardier and more flexible, even after repeated exposure to wild temperature swings.
发布时间: 2019 - 08 - 21
浏览次数:423
RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. A U.S. Army project discovery upends previous notions about how metals deform and could help guide the creation of stronger, more durable materials for military vehicles.
发布时间: 2019 - 08 - 15
浏览次数:119
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