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Scientists in the University of Maryland (UMD)'s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3D printing technologies, and beyond.Ceramics are widely used in batteries, electronics, and extreme environments -- but conventional ceramic sintering (part of the firing process used in the manufacture of ceramic objects) often requires hours of processing time. To overcome this challenge, a Maryland research team has invented an ultrafast high-temperature sintering method that both meets the needs of modern ceramics and fosters the discovery of new material innovations.The study is led by Liangbing Hu...
发布时间: 2020 - 05 - 07
浏览次数:226
Scientists have calculated that a hydrogen-rich compound could conduct electricity without resistance at temperatures up to about 200° Celsius — well above the 100° C boiling point of water. If that prediction is confirmed experimentally, the material would stand in stark contrast to all other known superconductors, which must be cooled below room temperature to work.
发布时间: 2019 - 09 - 18
浏览次数:358
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a process for welding ceramics that could have wide-ranging implications for the hardiness and construction of electronics.
发布时间: 2019 - 09 - 11
浏览次数:259
Researchers have found a way to use 3D printing to stretch and flatten twisted polymers so that they conduct electricity better.
发布时间: 2019 - 09 - 06
浏览次数:224
We live in a ceramic world. Ceramics are everywhere even in the world of engineering. The most important and general property of ceramics is that they are refractory. What does this mean? They are “rough-and-tumble” materials that will take large amounts of abuse in a wide range of situations. Don’t believe us?
发布时间: 2019 - 08 - 28
浏览次数:137
Ceramic aerogels have been protecting industrial equipment and space-bound scientific instruments for decades, thanks to their incredible lightness and ability to withstand intense heat. The problem is they can be pretty brittle. Now, a team led by researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) has developed a new ceramic aerogel that's far hardier and more flexible, even after repeated exposure to wild temperature swings.
发布时间: 2019 - 08 - 21
浏览次数:431
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